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USA

Liberal Christianity goes into meltdown

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 Contents - Sep 2006AD2000 September 2006 - Buy a copy now
Editorial: 2006 Fighting Fund launched - Peter Westmore
Conscience: AD2000 interviews Cardinal Pell - Cardinal George Pell
USA: Liberal Christianity goes into meltdown - Charlotte Allen
News: The Church Around the World
Chavagnes: Catholic education in a secular culture - Alexander Morrison
History: The Counter Reformation and the Jesuits - John Morrissey
Family in Society: Asian and Australian families face similar challenges - Leslie Sammut
Clergy: ACCC Annual Conference focuses on theology of Benedict XVI - AD2000 Report
Letters: Thomas Groome (letter) - C. Hungerford-Morgan
Letters: Baptism - Mark Moriarty
Letters: Correction to last month's reflection on Baptism - John Young
Letters: Communism - Frank Bellet
Letters: African pen-friend - Fr Vincent Kajoba
Letters: Safe Sex? - Arnold Jago
Letters: Judicial activism - Henk Verheven
Letters: Stolen faith - Marie Adamo
Letters: Helping the Carmelites - Beth Burns
Letters: Thank-you note - A. van Tilburg
Poetry: The Touch of the Master's Hand - Myra Welch
Books: William Bernard Ullathorne: A Different Kind of Monk, by Judith Champ - Michael Gilchrist (reviewer)
Books: Advancing the Culture of Death, by Peter Hung Manh Tran - Peter Westmore (reviewer)
Books: Why Must I Suffer? by Fr F.J. Remler CM - Jacinta Cummins (reviewer)
Books: Stimulating reading from Freedom Publishing
Reflection: Cardinal Arinze on the need for Eucharistic reverence - Cardinal Francis Arinze

The continuing decline of liberal Christianity in the United States mirrors what is occurring in Australia. This should serve as a cautionary tale for those in the Catholic Church who still see accommodation with secularism as the wave of the future.

Charlotte Allen is Catholicism editor for Beliefnet and author of 'The Human Christ: The Search for the Historical Jesus'. Her article originally appeared as an Op-ed piece in the 'Los Angeles Times'.

The accelerating fragmentation of the strife-torn Episcopal Church USA, in which several parishes and even a few dioceses are opting out of the church, is not simply about gay bishops, the blessing of same-sex unions or the election of a woman as presiding bishop. It also is about the meltdown of liberal Christianity.

Embraced by the leadership of all the mainline Protestant denominations, as well as large segments of American Catholicism, liberal Christianity has been hailed by its boosters for 40 years as the future of the Christian churches.

Instead, as all but a few die-hards now admit, all the mainline churches and movements within churches that have blurred doctrine and softened moral precepts are demographically declining and, in the case of the Episcopal Church, disintegrating.

It is not entirely coincidental that at about the same time the Episcopalians, at their general convention in Columbus, Ohio, were thumbing their noses at a directive from the worldwide Anglican Communion that they "repent" of confirming the openly gay Bishop V. Gene Robinson of New Hampshire three years ago, the Presbyterian Church USA, at its general assembly in Birmingham, Alabama, was turning itself into the laughing-stock of the blogosphere by tacitly approving alternative designations for the supposedly sexist Christian Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Among the suggested names were "Mother, Child and Womb" and "Rock, Redeemer and Friend."

Following the Episcopalian lead, the Presbyterians also voted to give local congregations the freedom to ordain openly cohabiting gay and lesbian ministers.

The Presbyterian Church USA is famous for its 1993 conference, co-sponsored with the United Methodist Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and other mainline churches, in which participants "reimagined" God as "Our Maker Sophia" and held a feminist-inspired "milk and honey" ritual designed to replace traditional bread-and-wine Communion.

As if to one-up the Presbyterians in jettisoning age-old elements of Christian belief, the Episcopalians at Columbus overwhelmingly refused even to consider a resolution affirming that Jesus Christ is Lord.

When a Christian church cannot bring itself to endorse a bedrock Christian theological statement repeatedly found in the New Testament, it is not a serious Christian church. It is a Church of What's Happening Now, conferring a feel-good imprimatur on whatever the liberal elements of secular society deem permissible or politically correct.

You want to have gay sex? Be a female bishop? Change God's name to Sophia? Go ahead. The just-elected Episcopal presiding bishop, Katharine Jefferts Schori, is a one-woman combination of all these, having voted for Robinson, blessed same-sex couples in her Nevada diocese, prayed to a female Jesus at the Columbus convention and invited John Shelby Spong, former Bishop of Newark, New Jersey, famous for denying Christ's divinity, to address her priests.

Empty pews

When a church doesn't take itself seriously, neither do its members. It is hard to believe that as recently as 1960, members of mainline churches - Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Methodists, Lutherans and the like - accounted for 40 percent of all American Protestants. Today, it is more like 12 percent (17 million out of 135 million).

Some of the precipitous decline is due to lower birthrates among the generally blue-state mainliners, but it also is clear that millions of mainline adherents (and especially their children) have simply walked out of the pews never to return.

According to the Hartford Institute for Religious Research, in 1965, there were 3.4 million Episcopalians; now, there are 2.3 million. The number of Presbyterians fell from 4.3 million in 1965 to 2.5 million today. Compare that with 16 million members reported by the Southern Baptists.

When your religion says "whatever" on doctrinal matters, regards Jesus as just another wise teacher, refuses on principle to evangelise and lets you do pretty much what you want, it's a short step to deciding that one of the things you don't want to do is get up on Sunday morning and go to church.

It doesn't help matters that the mainline churches were pioneers in ordaining women to the clergy, to the point that 25 percent of all Episcopal priests these days are female, as are 29 percent of all Presbyterian pastors, according to the two churches.

A causal connection between a critical mass of female clergy and a mass exodus from the churches, especially among men, would be difficult to establish, but is it entirely a coincidence?

Sociologist Rodney Stark (The Rise of Christianity) and historian Philip Jenkins (The Next Christendom) contend that the more demands, ethical and doctrinal, that a faith places upon its adherents, the deeper the adherents' commitment to that faith. Evangelical and Pentecostal churches, which preach biblical morality, have no trouble saying that Jesus is Lord, and they generally eschew women's ordination. The churches are growing robustly, both in the United States and around the world.

Despite the fact that median Sunday attendance at Episcopal churches is 80 worshipers, the Episcopal Church, as a whole, is financially equipped to carry on for some time, thanks to its inventory of vintage real estate and huge endowments left over from the days (no more!) when it was the Republican Party at prayer.

Furthermore, it has offset some of its demographic losses by attracting disaffected liberal Catholics and gays and lesbians. The less endowed Presbyterian Church USA is in deeper trouble. Just before its general assembly in Birmingham, it announced that it would eliminate 75 jobs to meet a $9.15-million budget cut at its headquarters, the third such round of job cuts in four years.

The Episcopalians have smells, bells, needlework cushions and colorfully garbed, Catholic-looking bishops as draws, but who, under the present circumstances, wants to become a Presbyterian?

Conservative theology

Still, it must be galling to Episcopal liberals that many of the parishes and dioceses (including that of San Joaquin, California) that want to pull out of the Episcopal Church USA are growing instead of shrinking, have live people in the pews who pay for the upkeep of their churches and don't have to rely on dead rich people.

The 21-year-old Christ Church Episcopal in Plano, Texas, for example, is one of the largest Episcopal churches in the country. Its 2,200 worshippers on any given Sunday are about equal to the number of active Episcopalians in Jefferts Schori's entire Nevada Diocese.

It is no surprise that Christ Church, like the other dissident parishes, preaches a very conservative theology.

As for the rest of the Episcopalians, the phrase "deck chairs on the Titanic" comes to mind. A number of liberal Episcopal websites are devoted these days to criticising Peter Akinola, outspoken primate of the Anglican diocese of Nigeria, who, like the vast majority of the world's 77 million Anglicans reported by the Anglican Communion, believes that "homosexual practice" is "incompatible with Scripture" (those words are from the communion's 1998 resolution at the Lambeth conference of bishops).

So this is the liberal Christianity that was supposed to be the Christianity of the future: disarray, schism, rapidly falling numbers of adherents, a collapse of Christology and national meetings that rival those of the Modern Language Association for their potential for cheap laughs.

And they keep telling the Catholic Church that it had better get with the liberal program - ordain women, bless gay unions and so forth - or die. Sure.

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Reprinted from AD2000 Vol 19 No 8 (September 2006), p. 4

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